Videos

710_4550968

W. Bradford Wilcox on Men and Marriage

View Video at PragerU
cohabitation apartment moving boxes

Scott Stanley on Sliding vs. Deciding

View Video on Youtube
poverty building

Poverty, Family, and Economics: An Interview with Brad Wilcox

View Video on Youtube
609_3683535

How Marriage Helps a Man’s Career


View Video at FoxNews.com
Globe from "The State of the Family in the World"

The State of the Family in the World

View Video on YouTube

Research

Screen Shot 2017-02-01 at 5.18.18 PM

Men and Marriage: Debunking the Ball and Chain Myth

Despite its prevalence, the “ball and chain” view of marriage for men is simply not supported by the research. Indeed, the benefits of marriage for men are substantial by every conceivable measure, including more money, a better sex life, and significantly better physical and mental health. Yet many men remain ignorant of these benefits, a view seemingly promoted by popular culture. This new IFS research brief by W. Bradford Wilcox and Nicholas H. Wolfinger debunks some of the most common myths about men and marriage.

Download the research brief
Screen Shot 2017-02-06 at 10.16.29 AM

World Family Map 2017

The World Family Map Project monitors the global health of the family by tracking 16 indicators of family structure, family socioeconomics, family processes, and family culture in multiple countries around the world. Each annual report of the project shares the latest data on these indicators, as well as an original essay focusing on one important aspect of contemporary family life. This fourth edition of the World Family Map, which is sponsored by the Social Trends Institute and a range of international educational and nongovernmental institutions, provides updated indicators of family structure worldwide. Go here to download the World Family Map.

strong-families-successful-students

Strong Families, Successful Students

A substantial body of research indicates that what happens in families—not just in schools—shapes children’s educational performance. Strong Families, Successful Students builds on this research to explore how student performance in Ohio is linked to family structure and poverty.

Strong Families, Successful Students
hopeworkingclass

Work-Family Policy in Trump’s America

What could the Trump administration do to help working-class families? In November 2016, less than three weeks after the election, IFS research fellows David and Amber Lapp conducted a focus group in a small town in southern Ohio to understand how white, working-class Millennials answer that question. This report details the findings from the Lapps’ focus group of white, working-class Millennial parents.

 

cover-30-pm

Marriage, Penalized: Does Social Welfare Policy Affect Family Formation?

Over the last few decades, marriage rates have declined among the poor and lower-middle class, but why? Does the expansion of federal aid programs bring with it penalties related to Medicaid, Welfare, and food stamps? If so, do these penalties affect families and their decision to marry? The Institute for Family Studies has partnered with AEI to release a new report, Marriage, Penalized: Does Social Welfare Policy Affect Family Formation? The report examines marriage penalties in means-tested programs, how these penalties affect new families, and whether these penalties have an impact on family formation.

Strong Families, Successful Schools

Stronger Families, Better Schools

A growing body of research indicates that what happens in families—not just in schools—shapes children’s educational performance. Stronger Families, Better Schools builds on such research to explore how student performance is linked to family structure, child poverty, and parental education at the school district level in Arizona. This report finds that the share of married-parent families in a school district is one of the strongest predictors of high school graduation rates in the Grand Canyon State. Indeed, the share of families headed by married couples is a more powerful predictor of high school graduation rates there than are child poverty rates, race, and ethnicity. Stronger Families, Better Schools also reveals that family structure is the best predictor of gender parity in high school graduation rates in Arizona school districts, according to our models. In other words, boys are significantly more likely to graduate at levels that parallel girls’ rates in Arizona districts with more married families. In sum, Arizona school districts that are home to strong and stable families also tend to enjoy more successful and gender-equitable schools. Accordingly, to improve children’s educational performance across the Grand Canyon State, policymakers, educators, and civic leaders should work to strengthen families as well as schools.

View Report
Strong Families, Successful Schools

Strong Families, Successful Schools

A growing body of research indicates that children’s family background is an important predictor of their performance in school. Strong Families, Successful Schools builds on this research to explore the links between family structure, family income, and parental education and student performance at the county level in Florida. Specifically, Strong Families, Successful Schools finds that the share of married parent families in a county is one of the strongest predictors of high school graduation rates in the 67 counties across Florida, as well as recent growth in high school graduation rates in the Sunshine State. The share of married families also is the strongest predictor of county school suspension rates in Florida in our models. Moreover, the share of families headed by married couples is a more powerful predictor of high school graduation and school suspension rates than are income, race, and ethnicity in Florida—factors that tend to get more attention in media and policy circles. The report also finds that parental education is the best predictor of county high school graduation rates in Florida, according to our models. In sum, Florida counties that enjoy strong and stable families also tend to enjoy more successful and safer schools. Accordingly, policymakers, educators, and civic leaders should work to strengthen families—as well as schools—across the Sunshine State.

View Report
710_4550968

W. Bradford Wilcox on Men and Marriage

View Video at PragerU
cohabitation apartment moving boxes

Scott Stanley on Sliding vs. Deciding

View Video on Youtube
wilcox_strong_families_cover_image_500x293

Strong Families, Prosperous States

Economics has its roots in the Greek word oikonomia, which means the “management of the household.” Yet economists across the ideological spectrum have paid little attention to the links between household family structure and the macroeconomic outcomes of nations, states, and societies. This is a major oversight because, as this report cosponsored by AEI and the Institute for Family Studies shows, shifts in marriage and family structure are important factors in states’ economic performance, including their economic growth, economic mobility, child poverty, and median family income.

AEI Website
the-report-2015

World Family Map 2015

The World Family Map Project monitors the global health of the family by tracking 16 indicators of family structure, family socioeconomics, family processes, and family culture in multiple countries around the world. Each annual report of the project shares the latest data on these indicators, as well as an original essay focusing on one important aspect of contemporary family life. This year’s essay investigates how variations in union status and work-family arrangements are associated with men’s and women’s self-reported level of happiness.

Report Website
Screen Shot 2015-08-08 at 9.26.12 PM

The Future of Marriage

An astonishing 40 percent of children in the U.S. are born to unmarried women, a clear indication that marriage as an institution appears to be in jeopardy. Many never-married, low-income women are struggling to raise children in single-parent households, while a significant portion of more affluent young people are opting out of marriage in favor of a single’s lifestyle. Does all this mean that marriage is beyond saving? Can marriage be saved? Should it be saved? W. Bradford Wilcox, Senior Fellow at the Institute for Family Studies, participated in a panel discussion on these questions at the Independent Women’s Forum in Washington, D.C. in May of 2015. The discussion is available in booklet form on the IWF website.
Independent Women's Forum Website
poverty building

Poverty, Family, and Economics: An Interview with Brad Wilcox

View Video on Youtube
soul mates cover

Soul Mates: Religion, Sex, Love, and Marriage among African Americans and Latinos

by W. Bradford Wilcox and Nicholas H. Wolfinger (Oxford University Press, 2016)

Drawing on both surveys and in-depth interviews, Soul Mates describes the largely positive influence churches exercise on relationships and marriage among African Americans and Latinos. W. Bradford Wilcox and Nicholas H. Wolfinger argue that churches serving these communities promote a code of decency, encompassing hard work, temperance, and personal responsibility, that benefits families. The book offers a wealth of insight into the challenges African American and Latino families face.

Pre-order the Book
609_3683535

How Marriage Helps a Man’s Career


View Video at FoxNews.com
Globe from "The State of the Family in the World"

The State of the Family in the World

View Video on YouTube
Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.08.10 PM

World Family Map 2014

World Family Map is sponsored by Child Trends, an international organization that seeks to improve the lives of children and youth by conducting high-quality research and sharing it with the people and institutions whose decisions and actions affect children. The report is also sponsored by the Doha International Family Institute, Institute for Family Studies, Focus Global, and Social Trends Institute. The report is co-sponsored by Myers-JDC-Brookdale Institute, Netherlands Youth Institute, Seoul National University, Intermedia Social Innovation, Universidad De Los Andes, Universitat Internacional De Catalunya, Universidad De Piura, Universidad De La Sabana.

Report Website
college graduation students

Dad and the Diploma: The Difference Fathers Make for College Graduation

In this policy brief published by AEI, W. Bradford Wilcox shows that young adults who as teens had involved fathers are significantly more likely to graduate from college, and that young adults from more privileged backgrounds are especially likely to have had an involved father in their lives as teens.

Download PDF
gender-parenthood

Gender and Parenthood: Biological and Social Scientific Perspectives

Edited by W. Bradford Wilcox and Kathleen Kovner Kline (Columbia University Press, 2013)

The twelve essays in this volume offer insights from biology and the social sciences about how men and women parent their children and how the experience of parenthood transforms women and men. They analyze how gendered parenting affects the well-being of children, the quality of romantic relationships, and the balance between paid employment and family life, thus illuminating ongoing debates about gender roles, single-parent families, and work and family.

Buy the Book
power

The Power of Commitment: A Guide to Active, Lifelong Love

by Scott M. Stanley (Jossey-Bass, 2005)

In a society that fears commitment—with the declining marriage rates and high divorce rates to prove it—how can you forge a lasting relationship? Scott Stanley provides a research-based method for understanding and living out commitment, from the ordinary pressures of daily life to surviving the pain of unfulfilled dreams and avoiding the temptation to stray from your spouse.

Buy the Book
manning-up

Manning Up: How the Rise of Women Has Turned Men into Boys

by Kay Hymowitz (Basic Books, 2011)

Young men seem to be stuck in adolescence as young women do better than them in school, earn more college degrees, and increasingly dominate the most vibrant sectors of the economy. Both men and women are getting married later than ever, and as they struggle to navigate conflicting sets of rules about dating and marriage, many despair of finding a mate at all. Kay Hymowitz analyzes how these trends arose and how we can expect them to affect family life and society.

Buy the Book

The New Unmarried Mom

by Kay Hymowitz, W. Bradford Wilcox, and Kelleen Kaye
Wall Street Journal

Most of today’s single moms aren’t teens; they’re working-class twentysomethings. Like their more highly educated counterparts, they’re putting off marriage—but not reaping the same benefits.

Article Website

Marriage and Caste

by Kay Hymowitz
City Journal

America’s chief source of inequality? The Marriage Gap.

Article Website

The Distinct, Positive Impact of a Good Dad

by Bradford Wilcox
The Atlantic

Dads aren’t just a good source of a paycheck or a second adult in the home. Rather, like moms, dads make particular, invaluable contributions to their children’s lives.

Article Website

The Evolution of Divorce

by W. Bradford Wilcox
National Affairs

Divorce has declined since the 1970s, but remains common among the less educated. That means marriage and family stability, with all their benefits for children, are increasingly the province of the rich.

Article Website
WFM-2013-Cover-Final

World Family Map 2013

World Family Map is sponsored by Child Trends, an international organization that seeks to improve the lives of children and youth by conducting high-quality research and sharing it with the people and institutions whose decisions and actions affect children. The report is also sponsored by the Annie E. Casey Foundation, Focus Global and Social Trends Institute. The report is co-sponsored by the Institute Of Marriage And Family Canada, Netherlands Youth Institute, Seoul National University, Universidad De Los Andes (Chile), University Of Asia And The Pacific (Philippines), Universidad De La Sabana (Colombia), and Universidad De Piura (Peru).

Report Website

Articles

hopeworkingclass

Work-Family Policy in Trump’s America

What could the Trump administration do to help working-class families? In November 2016, less than three weeks after the election, IFS research fellows David and Amber Lapp conducted a focus group in a small town in southern Ohio to understand how white, working-class Millennials answer that question. This report details the findings from the Lapps’ focus group of white, working-class Millennial parents.

 

The New Unmarried Mom

by Kay Hymowitz, W. Bradford Wilcox, and Kelleen Kaye
Wall Street Journal

Most of today’s single moms aren’t teens; they’re working-class twentysomethings. Like their more highly educated counterparts, they’re putting off marriage—but not reaping the same benefits.

Article Website

Marriage and Caste

by Kay Hymowitz
City Journal

America’s chief source of inequality? The Marriage Gap.

Article Website

The Distinct, Positive Impact of a Good Dad

by Bradford Wilcox
The Atlantic

Dads aren’t just a good source of a paycheck or a second adult in the home. Rather, like moms, dads make particular, invaluable contributions to their children’s lives.

Article Website

The Evolution of Divorce

by W. Bradford Wilcox
National Affairs

Divorce has declined since the 1970s, but remains common among the less educated. That means marriage and family stability, with all their benefits for children, are increasingly the province of the rich.

Article Website

Books

soul mates cover

Soul Mates: Religion, Sex, Love, and Marriage among African Americans and Latinos

by W. Bradford Wilcox and Nicholas H. Wolfinger (Oxford University Press, 2016)

Drawing on both surveys and in-depth interviews, Soul Mates describes the largely positive influence churches exercise on relationships and marriage among African Americans and Latinos. W. Bradford Wilcox and Nicholas H. Wolfinger argue that churches serving these communities promote a code of decency, encompassing hard work, temperance, and personal responsibility, that benefits families. The book offers a wealth of insight into the challenges African American and Latino families face.

Pre-order the Book
gender-parenthood

Gender and Parenthood: Biological and Social Scientific Perspectives

Edited by W. Bradford Wilcox and Kathleen Kovner Kline (Columbia University Press, 2013)

The twelve essays in this volume offer insights from biology and the social sciences about how men and women parent their children and how the experience of parenthood transforms women and men. They analyze how gendered parenting affects the well-being of children, the quality of romantic relationships, and the balance between paid employment and family life, thus illuminating ongoing debates about gender roles, single-parent families, and work and family.

Buy the Book
power

The Power of Commitment: A Guide to Active, Lifelong Love

by Scott M. Stanley (Jossey-Bass, 2005)

In a society that fears commitment—with the declining marriage rates and high divorce rates to prove it—how can you forge a lasting relationship? Scott Stanley provides a research-based method for understanding and living out commitment, from the ordinary pressures of daily life to surviving the pain of unfulfilled dreams and avoiding the temptation to stray from your spouse.

Buy the Book
manning-up

Manning Up: How the Rise of Women Has Turned Men into Boys

by Kay Hymowitz (Basic Books, 2011)

Young men seem to be stuck in adolescence as young women do better than them in school, earn more college degrees, and increasingly dominate the most vibrant sectors of the economy. Both men and women are getting married later than ever, and as they struggle to navigate conflicting sets of rules about dating and marriage, many despair of finding a mate at all. Kay Hymowitz analyzes how these trends arose and how we can expect them to affect family life and society.

Buy the Book

Reports

Screen Shot 2017-02-01 at 5.18.18 PM

Men and Marriage: Debunking the Ball and Chain Myth

Despite its prevalence, the “ball and chain” view of marriage for men is simply not supported by the research. Indeed, the benefits of marriage for men are substantial by every conceivable measure, including more money, a better sex life, and significantly better physical and mental health. Yet many men remain ignorant of these benefits, a view seemingly promoted by popular culture. This new IFS research brief by W. Bradford Wilcox and Nicholas H. Wolfinger debunks some of the most common myths about men and marriage.

Download the research brief
Screen Shot 2017-02-06 at 10.16.29 AM

World Family Map 2017

The World Family Map Project monitors the global health of the family by tracking 16 indicators of family structure, family socioeconomics, family processes, and family culture in multiple countries around the world. Each annual report of the project shares the latest data on these indicators, as well as an original essay focusing on one important aspect of contemporary family life. This fourth edition of the World Family Map, which is sponsored by the Social Trends Institute and a range of international educational and nongovernmental institutions, provides updated indicators of family structure worldwide. Go here to download the World Family Map.

strong-families-successful-students

Strong Families, Successful Students

A substantial body of research indicates that what happens in families—not just in schools—shapes children’s educational performance. Strong Families, Successful Students builds on this research to explore how student performance in Ohio is linked to family structure and poverty.

Strong Families, Successful Students
hopeworkingclass

Work-Family Policy in Trump’s America

What could the Trump administration do to help working-class families? In November 2016, less than three weeks after the election, IFS research fellows David and Amber Lapp conducted a focus group in a small town in southern Ohio to understand how white, working-class Millennials answer that question. This report details the findings from the Lapps’ focus group of white, working-class Millennial parents.

 

cover-30-pm

Marriage, Penalized: Does Social Welfare Policy Affect Family Formation?

Over the last few decades, marriage rates have declined among the poor and lower-middle class, but why? Does the expansion of federal aid programs bring with it penalties related to Medicaid, Welfare, and food stamps? If so, do these penalties affect families and their decision to marry? The Institute for Family Studies has partnered with AEI to release a new report, Marriage, Penalized: Does Social Welfare Policy Affect Family Formation? The report examines marriage penalties in means-tested programs, how these penalties affect new families, and whether these penalties have an impact on family formation.

Strong Families, Successful Schools

Stronger Families, Better Schools

A growing body of research indicates that what happens in families—not just in schools—shapes children’s educational performance. Stronger Families, Better Schools builds on such research to explore how student performance is linked to family structure, child poverty, and parental education at the school district level in Arizona. This report finds that the share of married-parent families in a school district is one of the strongest predictors of high school graduation rates in the Grand Canyon State. Indeed, the share of families headed by married couples is a more powerful predictor of high school graduation rates there than are child poverty rates, race, and ethnicity. Stronger Families, Better Schools also reveals that family structure is the best predictor of gender parity in high school graduation rates in Arizona school districts, according to our models. In other words, boys are significantly more likely to graduate at levels that parallel girls’ rates in Arizona districts with more married families. In sum, Arizona school districts that are home to strong and stable families also tend to enjoy more successful and gender-equitable schools. Accordingly, to improve children’s educational performance across the Grand Canyon State, policymakers, educators, and civic leaders should work to strengthen families as well as schools.

View Report
Strong Families, Successful Schools

Strong Families, Successful Schools

A growing body of research indicates that children’s family background is an important predictor of their performance in school. Strong Families, Successful Schools builds on this research to explore the links between family structure, family income, and parental education and student performance at the county level in Florida. Specifically, Strong Families, Successful Schools finds that the share of married parent families in a county is one of the strongest predictors of high school graduation rates in the 67 counties across Florida, as well as recent growth in high school graduation rates in the Sunshine State. The share of married families also is the strongest predictor of county school suspension rates in Florida in our models. Moreover, the share of families headed by married couples is a more powerful predictor of high school graduation and school suspension rates than are income, race, and ethnicity in Florida—factors that tend to get more attention in media and policy circles. The report also finds that parental education is the best predictor of county high school graduation rates in Florida, according to our models. In sum, Florida counties that enjoy strong and stable families also tend to enjoy more successful and safer schools. Accordingly, policymakers, educators, and civic leaders should work to strengthen families—as well as schools—across the Sunshine State.

View Report
wilcox_strong_families_cover_image_500x293

Strong Families, Prosperous States

Economics has its roots in the Greek word oikonomia, which means the “management of the household.” Yet economists across the ideological spectrum have paid little attention to the links between household family structure and the macroeconomic outcomes of nations, states, and societies. This is a major oversight because, as this report cosponsored by AEI and the Institute for Family Studies shows, shifts in marriage and family structure are important factors in states’ economic performance, including their economic growth, economic mobility, child poverty, and median family income.

AEI Website
the-report-2015

World Family Map 2015

The World Family Map Project monitors the global health of the family by tracking 16 indicators of family structure, family socioeconomics, family processes, and family culture in multiple countries around the world. Each annual report of the project shares the latest data on these indicators, as well as an original essay focusing on one important aspect of contemporary family life. This year’s essay investigates how variations in union status and work-family arrangements are associated with men’s and women’s self-reported level of happiness.

Report Website
Screen Shot 2015-08-08 at 9.26.12 PM

The Future of Marriage

An astonishing 40 percent of children in the U.S. are born to unmarried women, a clear indication that marriage as an institution appears to be in jeopardy. Many never-married, low-income women are struggling to raise children in single-parent households, while a significant portion of more affluent young people are opting out of marriage in favor of a single’s lifestyle. Does all this mean that marriage is beyond saving? Can marriage be saved? Should it be saved? W. Bradford Wilcox, Senior Fellow at the Institute for Family Studies, participated in a panel discussion on these questions at the Independent Women’s Forum in Washington, D.C. in May of 2015. The discussion is available in booklet form on the IWF website.
Independent Women's Forum Website
Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.08.10 PM

World Family Map 2014

World Family Map is sponsored by Child Trends, an international organization that seeks to improve the lives of children and youth by conducting high-quality research and sharing it with the people and institutions whose decisions and actions affect children. The report is also sponsored by the Doha International Family Institute, Institute for Family Studies, Focus Global, and Social Trends Institute. The report is co-sponsored by Myers-JDC-Brookdale Institute, Netherlands Youth Institute, Seoul National University, Intermedia Social Innovation, Universidad De Los Andes, Universitat Internacional De Catalunya, Universidad De Piura, Universidad De La Sabana.

Report Website
college graduation students

Dad and the Diploma: The Difference Fathers Make for College Graduation

In this policy brief published by AEI, W. Bradford Wilcox shows that young adults who as teens had involved fathers are significantly more likely to graduate from college, and that young adults from more privileged backgrounds are especially likely to have had an involved father in their lives as teens.

Download PDF
WFM-2013-Cover-Final

World Family Map 2013

World Family Map is sponsored by Child Trends, an international organization that seeks to improve the lives of children and youth by conducting high-quality research and sharing it with the people and institutions whose decisions and actions affect children. The report is also sponsored by the Annie E. Casey Foundation, Focus Global and Social Trends Institute. The report is co-sponsored by the Institute Of Marriage And Family Canada, Netherlands Youth Institute, Seoul National University, Universidad De Los Andes (Chile), University Of Asia And The Pacific (Philippines), Universidad De La Sabana (Colombia), and Universidad De Piura (Peru).

Report Website